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14/04/2014 12:00am
Pesach (Passover) is the annual festival of the liberation of the People of Israel from slavery in Egypt, as recorded in Exodus. The 'seder' - the ordered ritual meal on 1st and 2nd nights - is laden with meaning of practical and spiritual liberation. Pesach requires a lot of preparation as homes must be free of all 'chametz' - yeast and yeast-containing produce. Pesach lasts for 8 days, although work can be performed on days 3-7 (2-7 in Israel).
18/04/2014 12:00am
A religious holiday observed primarily by Christians commemorating the crucifixion of Jesus Christ and his death at Calvary. The holiday is observed during Holy Week as part of the Paschal Triduum on the Friday preceding Easter Sunday. It is also known as Holy Friday, Great Friday, Black Friday, or Easter Friday, though the latter properly refers to the Friday in Easter week.
28/04/2014 7:30pm
CCJ Oxford and Oxford Jewish Congregation join together in this solemn remembrance of the Holocaust. Testimony, music and Hebrew prayers are woven together in this moving ceremony. Post event refreshments.
30/04/2014 8:00pm
Jacob Vince of Christian Friends of Israel will give an overview of varying views and the information they draw upon. This will also be CCJ Staines AGM.
 

CCJ Position Statement: Zionism & Anti-Zionism

Definition of Zionism
Modern Zionism began in the late 19th century as a legitimate desire and vision of the Jewish people for a national homeland. This culminated in the establishment of the sovereign state of Israel in 1948.
 
Therefore CCJ defines Zionism today as:
“The continuing legitimate desire and need of the Jewish people for a national homeland in the sovereign state of Israel”.

Historic Roots
The historic roots of Zionism have been a factor in Jewish spirituality since the destruction of Jerusalem in 70CE and the subsequent dispersion of Jewish communities throughout the world.

Since 70CE there has been a continuous Jewish presence in the land. The Jewish people’s connection with Jerusalem and the land of Israel is embodied in their daily liturgy and practices.

Anti-Zionism
Zionism is often misrepresented by those who oppose it. People have a right to criticise policies of the Israeli government, or actions of its citizens. Such criticism does not necessarily constitute anti-Zionism. CCJ would define as anti-Zionist those who would deny the Jewish people a legitimate homeland in Israel, and those who would deny the right of Israel to exist.

Anti-Zionism can also be used as a proxy for antisemitism. As examples of this, CCJ regards anti-Zionism as antisemitism when its proponents:
  • Fail to promote equally self-determination of Palestinians and Israelis
  • Wilfully use the terms “Jews” and “Israelis” and Judaism and Israeli nationality interchangeably
  • Consider only discrimination against, or injustice to, Palestinians to the exclusion of that of Israeli Jews
  • Judge Israel by standards which are not applied equally and impartially to all other countries
 
News
Can Christians learn from the highly regulated patterns of grieving practised by observant Jews? How does a Jewish funeral proper compare and contrast with a Christian one?
Does this put Christians in touch with their ‘Jewish roots’, or involve something of a ‘colonial takeover’ of a Jewish practice which in at least some respects is probably centuries later than Jesus? Patrick led a candid discussion.
Exploring and reflecting on the Jewish experience of the second world war and its legacy, was the focus of an inspiring visit to Beth Shalom Holocaust Centre.
I had the great privilege of sharing with our Jewish friends of the Council of Christians and Jews an evening at St. Paul's Cathedral.