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events
22/04/2015 8:00pm
Speaker: Sr Margaret Shepherd, a former Director of CCJ.
23/04/2015 8:00pm
The speaker is distinguished American author Rabbi David J. Zucker PhD, a scholar of both the Jewish and Christian scriptures.
27/04/2015 5:15pm
Professor Amy-Jill Levine (Vanderbilt University) will be giving the Sherman Lectures in Jewish Studies entitled "Jesus, Judaism and Christianity: Old Prejudices and New Possibilities"
30/04/2015 7:30pm
Speaker: Kelvin Crombie (Author and Historian) Cost: £3 Admission to include refreshments Further information: ccjbaw@gmail.com
 

CCJ Position Statement: Zionism & Anti-Zionism

Definition of Zionism
Modern Zionism began in the late 19th century as a legitimate desire and vision of the Jewish people for a national homeland. This culminated in the establishment of the sovereign state of Israel in 1948.
 
Therefore CCJ defines Zionism today as:
“The continuing legitimate desire and need of the Jewish people for a national homeland in the sovereign state of Israel”.

Historic Roots
The historic roots of Zionism have been a factor in Jewish spirituality since the destruction of Jerusalem in 70CE and the subsequent dispersion of Jewish communities throughout the world.

Since 70CE there has been a continuous Jewish presence in the land. The Jewish people’s connection with Jerusalem and the land of Israel is embodied in their daily liturgy and practices.

Anti-Zionism
Zionism is often misrepresented by those who oppose it. People have a right to criticise policies of the Israeli government, or actions of its citizens. Such criticism does not necessarily constitute anti-Zionism. CCJ would define as anti-Zionist those who would deny the Jewish people a legitimate homeland in Israel, and those who would deny the right of Israel to exist.

Anti-Zionism can also be used as a proxy for antisemitism. As examples of this, CCJ regards anti-Zionism as antisemitism when its proponents:
  • Fail to promote equally self-determination of Palestinians and Israelis
  • Wilfully use the terms “Jews” and “Israelis” and Judaism and Israeli nationality interchangeably
  • Consider only discrimination against, or injustice to, Palestinians to the exclusion of that of Israeli Jews
  • Judge Israel by standards which are not applied equally and impartially to all other countries
 
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